Category Archives: Events

BCGL 9: Second Call for Papers

CRISSP is proud to present the ninth instalment of the Brussels Conference on Generative Linguistics (BCGL), devoted to Phase Theory.

BCGL 9: Phase Theory
Brussels, December 13-14, 2016.

Invited speakers

Workshop description

Throughout the history of generative grammar, there have been various ways of implementing locality effects, for example through Transformational Cycles (Chomsky 1965; Kayne 1969) or Barriers (Chomsky 1986). Phase Theory (Uriagereka 1999; Chomsky 2000, 2001) constitutes the most recent development in this line of thinking. It is often argued that there exist discrete structural domains in natural language that exhibit a degree of syntactic, semantic, and phonological independence from their surrounding linguistic environment. Phase Theory offers a tool for understanding such domains. However, since the inception of phases, there have been many different proposals about the specific formalization of this concept, along with much debate about the extent to which phases can be evidenced empirically (and indeed whether phases exist at all). The aim of this workshop is to discuss the empirical validity and theoretical specifics of Phase Theory.
The submission deadline for abstracts is September 1, 2016.

Read the complete Call for Papers

CRISSP 10

BCGL 9 will be followed by CRISSP 10, a one-day workshop celebrating the 10th anniversary of the research institute CRISSP featuring invited presentations by Luigi Rizzi, Alec Marantz, and Angelika Kratzer, among others.

Sabine Iatridou and Jan-Wouter Zwart at CRISSP

Sabine Iatridou will give a lecture series on tense and aspect on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. Also on Friday, Jan-Wouter Zwart will give a seminar entitled ‘Periphrastic morphology, verb clusters, and verb movement’.

> The Iatridou Lectures: Fancy Games with Tense and Aspect
> CRISSP Seminar with Jan-Wouter Zwart: Periphrastic morphology, verb clusters, and verb movement

 

BCGL 9: First Call for Papers

CRISSP is proud to present the ninth instalment of the Brussels Conference on Generative Linguistics (BCGL), devoted to Phase Theory.

BCGL 9: Phase Theory
Brussels, December 13-14, 2016.

Invited speakers

Workshop description

Throughout the history of generative grammar, there have been various ways of implementing locality effects, for example through Transformational Cycles (Chomsky 1965; Kayne 1969) or Barriers (Chomsky 1986). Phase Theory (Uriagereka 1999; Chomsky 2000, 2001) constitutes the most recent development in this line of thinking. It is often argued that there exist discrete structural domains in natural language that exhibit a degree of syntactic, semantic, and phonological independence from their surrounding linguistic environment. Phase Theory offers a tool for understanding such domains. However, since the inception of phases, there have been many different proposals about the specific formalization of this concept, along with much debate about the extent to which phases can be evidenced empirically (and indeed whether phases exist at all). The aim of this workshop is to discuss the empirical validity and theoretical specifics of Phase Theory.
The submission deadline for abstracts is September 1, 2016.

> Read the complete Call for Papers

CRISSP 10

BCGL 9 will be followed by CRISSP 10, a one-day workshop celebrating the 10th anniversary of the research institute CRISSP featuring invited presentations by Luigi Rizzi, Alec Marantz, and Angelika Kratzer, among others.

KrowFest on 1 April

CRISSP (KU Leuven) is proud to present the workshop KrowFest, celebrating Koen Roelandt’s defense.

KrowFest
Friday April 1, 2016
KU Leuven Brussels Campus
Room 6306 (Building Hermes 3)

Invited speakers
Louise McNally (Universitat Pompeu Fabra)
Chris Barker (New York University)
Rick Nouwen (Utrecht University)

> Read the complete program

CRISSP Seminar with Željko Bošković

CRISSP is happy to announce another installment in the CRISSP Seminar series:

Lecturer: Željko Bošković (University of Connecticut)

Title: On the locality of movement: Be careful when you label

Date & time: Friday 6 November 2015, 17h30

Location: CRISSP/KULeuven Brussels Campus, room 2212

Participation: free

Abstract:

The talk will provide a uniform account of a number of locality effects, in particular, the ban on movement out of moved elements, the CED effect (the Adjunct Condition and the Subject Condition), Richards’s (2001) tucking in effect, and the full Comp-trace paradigm, including (in addition to the basic cases) relative and extraposed clauses, the impossibility of short-subject topicalization, French que-qui alternation, and the effect of wh-movement on agreement in languages like Kinande.